Micato Musings


Posts Tagged ‘Micato’

Welcome to South Africa, Mr. Bond

  • June 30th 2011
Franschhoek

Franschhoek

The name’s Town. Cape Town. The South Africa capital and its environs figure prominently in the newest James Bond novel Carte Blanche and the city’s tourism bureau is evidently thrilled about the potential attention, according to the Independent Online.

We’re thrilled as well, given that Micato’s tour operations have long extended into some of the same South African locales that 007 reportedly passes through in the book.

For instance, just as Bond visits historic Robben Island — where Nelson Mandela was incarcerated – so do guests on our South African Sweeping Sojourn. Bond also spends time in Franschhoek, which he calls “the most beautiful spot on the Western Cape,” reports the Independent.

While we don’t condone many of the fictional spy’s methods, we do agree with him about Franschhoek. Micato’s Travel + Leisure World’s Best Safari takes our guests to this quaint colonial town and leaves them in the care of the Cape Winelands’ Le Quartier Francais, a retreat whose luxurious suites and top-shelf cuisine would certainly be up to 007’s standards.

Likewise, the Franschhoek Valley is a stopping point for our South African Grand Golf Safari and if Bond is going to do anything with his South Africa leisure time beyond the amorous, automotive, or culinary, we’re certain golf and fine wine would be a priority.

Micato’s in-house Bond fanatics haven’t read the novel yet, but they’re betting that if a luxury train ride is at all part of the plot, that train would have to be the Rovos Rail.

Running from Cape Town to Victoria Falls, the Rovos Rail is often billed as the most luxurious train in the world. We can imagine Sean Connery or Daniel Craig’s Bond eluding a lurking foe just long enough to tuck into a five-star meal in the train’s Victorian dining room, just as our guests do — minus having to elude a lurking foe, of course.

Whether holidays or houses, Micato helps build dreams

  • June 16th 2011

“You will be at ease only in your own home” – African Proverb

As a safari company we have lots of practice helping people build their vacation dreams, and with our nonprofit arm AmericaShare we’ve learned how to help children build their futures. This past week, our New York office decamped to New Jersey for a day to build… a house?

That’s right, although our expert Safari Specialists know much more about luxury lodges and helicopter excursions then they do about hammers and shovels, they have nevertheless been trekking out to Paterson, New Jersey and working with Habitat for Humanity there for the last ten years.

Yet being an expert on Africa and volunteering to build a house aren’t as mutually exclusive as one might think. Of the hundreds of families that Paterson Habitat has helped, a significant portion of them have been Kenyan – in fact, 10% of all non-designated contributions go straight to their global partnership in Kenya. The direct cost of a Habitat house in Kenya is $1,000, so you can imagine how far even 10% of funds can go – HFH Kenya has helped to put a roof over the heads of 5,000 Kenyan families in the last 27 years alone!

In our experience in the Mukuru slum of Nairobi, where AmericaShare is based, we’ve grown used to the sight of ramshackle huts constructed of corrugated tin with rusted holes, each one-room building home to a multitude of family members. We’ve been inside some of them, stepping onto the clean-swept dirt floors, and marveled at the enduring smiles on the faces of the people who live here, making the best of what they have, as little as it may be.

Habitat has given our friends in Kenya, and people like them around the world, a reason to hope for something better. We were able to witness this firsthand in Paterson, as we dug holes and lifted cement blocks alongside local Habitat house recipients, who work for “sweat equity” on their new homes. One young woman spoke shyly about how excited she was for a real home to share with her mom, and the hope it gave her to someday realize her dream of working in the fashion industry.

Her words are echoed by the Kenyan’s who have received homes from HFH Kenya, with Paterson Habitat aid. A home can make a life, as Kisii, Kenya native Ruth Kwamboka Gisemba articulates perfectly:

“Like an old rugged cloth, my life was in a mess before I owned a HFH house.”

“If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them” -Henry David Thoreau

Micato’s Top Ten Africa-Inspired Beach Reads

  • June 9th 2011

“Until the lion has his own storyteller, the hunter will always have the best part of the story.” – African Proverb

The hot sun on the pavement reminds us that long summer days of lounging on the beach are fast approaching. When it comes time to pack our Micato duffel bags for a weekend of surf, sun, and seafood, we always remember to include sunscreen, a hat, a towel, and of course, our favorite beach books.

A good beach read is evocative of exotic lands, all the better to get you into the vacation spirit. Our favorites, naturally, are Africa-centric – not only is it our beloved home, but Africa is also a land of nearly endless summer weather and boundless adventure, which recalls the excitement of the summer vacations of childhood.

Whether you are bound by luxury train for the ethereal beauty of Namibia’s Skeleton Coast, flying in an elegantly appointed private jet to the golden and turquoise glory of Zanzibar, or simply taking the jitney up to the Hamptons, the following books will get you in the proper summer spirit – a time of year when anything can happen!

Out of Africa

Isak Dinesen

This best-selling classic is even better than the movie, although admittedly lacking the draw of Robert Redford. The tale of a naïve young woman who leaves Denmark to start a coffee plantation in East Africa, Out of Africa is a moving love story inspired by affection for Kenya and its people.

##

West with the Night

Beryl Markham

Markham describes her childhood in Kenya and her experiences as a bush pilot in the 1930s with rich and vivid detail. West with the Night is a stylish and engrossing story of a unique life well lived.

##

The Flame Trees of Thika

Elsbeth Huxley

Her parents were pioneers in Thika, Kenya, and Huxley was along for the ride. This tale of creating a home in the wild is lavishly and lovingly drawn.

##

The Tree Where Man Was Born

Peter Matthieseen

Reading Matthieseen’s travels is almost as good as travelling yourself. As he journeys through the Africa of 1972, we join him in Maasailand, Ngorongoro Carter, and the Kenyan Highlands. Crouch in the bush with him and bear witness to the majestic animals living out age-old dramas mere feet away – just remember to look up from the book and check on the kids from time to time.

##

The Collector of Treasure

Bessie Head

Head is widely hailed as one of Africa’s great writers, and this collection of stories is further proof of her power with the pen. Her eloquent vignettes of village life in Botswana revolve around themes of family, prejudice, and power.

##

Africa, A Biography of the Continent

John Reader

This one is a must-read for the history buffs in the family, but Reader is so talented that anyone could enjoy this book. He masterfully weaves a lively tale of the continent, from the most ancient cultures right up to modern times.

##

North of South, An African Journey

Shiva Naipaul

Nobel Prize winner Naipaul paints a sharp portrait of Africa as it was in 1979. As a brilliant and provocative observer, he meditates on the various peoples he encounters in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia. This is hands-down the best, most insightful book we’ve read about race relations in Africa.

##

The Green Hills of Africa

Ernest Hemingway

A wonderfully readable tale of hunting in the Lake Manyara area of Tanzania. An account of the classic safari experience from one of the original safari aficionados, The Green Hills of Africa also contains some of the best writing about the land itself.

##

Heinemann Book of Contemporary African Short Stories

Chinua Achebe & Lynn Innes

Short stories, with their requirement of a limited attention span, are perfect for a family vacation. This single-volume introduction to the vast literature of Africa is our favorite collection, containing stories spanning the last 37 years.

##

The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency

Alexander McCall Smith

This one meets all the quintessential beach book requirements: funny, well-written, and evocative of both relaxation and adventure. This is the first of twelve books in Smith’s female detective series of the same name, so if his delightful descriptions of the culture of Botswana appeal to you, snap up the next book, Tears of the Giraffe.