Micato Musings


Posts Tagged ‘Micato Safaris’

Micato’s Africa… by Helicopter!

  • January 11th 2012

Your helicopter grazes the leaves of a montane forest, thick with the hoots of monkeys and caws of birds. Remote deserts undulate off into infinity. Jewels of lakes teem with green crocodiles, or shine pink with flamingos.

Yes, we said your helicopter. Because while a Micato safari provides a lifetime of exhilaration, a Micato safari by helicopter literally takes exhilaration to a different level, making what once may have seemed inaccessible perfectly accessible.

The Pinto Family, left to right: Joy, Sasha, Tristan, and Dennis, and their pilot

The fact is, Micato has been arranging helicopter excursions for years, but recently we’ve seen an increased demand from our guests for this exceptional experience.

Imagine. In a helicopter, Africa’s majestic landscape is entirely yours. As you soar through the sky—flying low with doors open—you may see all manner of wildlife, from galloping herds to predators on the prowl. And the scenery is breathtaking. Your pilot cuts deftly between two towering kopjes, and you marvel at the landscape seen from this new and unimaginable angle.

Victoria Falls, seen from a helicopter

What makes your helicopter ride not just joyous, but convenient, is your ability to stop on a dime. From the rim of a crater to the top of a mountain, and everywhere in between. You might wish to visit a far-flung village, have sundowners on the steepes of a snowy mountain, or picnic near a gin-clear and isolated rock pool.

Having a personal chef cook your catch would likely provide enough fodder for a story to tell, but what if you caught that fish directly from your helicopter? And why not? Your wish is our command — that’s the beauty not only of an exclusive helicopter excursion, but of everything we do here. With Micato, by helicopter, the sky truly is the limit.

What’s on Your 2012 Bucket List?

  • January 5th 2012

The newest edition of 1,000 Places to See Before You Die was released before the holidays, and we were delighted to find Micato Safaris listed as the tour operator of choice in one of our favourite game-viewing locations, the Maasai Mara.

This is the first update to the original 1,000 Places to See Before You Die, which was released in 2003—coincidentally, also the year Micato won the first of its eight Travel + Leisure #1 World’s Best Awards. Travel writer Patricia Schultz and her team of researchers compiled the first edition as a geographically organized list of the best cultural, natural, historical and thrill-inducing sights and experiences in the world. It was an instant hit and a #1 New York Times Bestseller. It’s no wonder: the title alone is a magnet to those with even a drop of wanderlust in their blood.

Presciently, the first edition of 1,000 Places also came out a full four years before the movie The Bucket List hit theaters and made the term an instant shorthand for a personal list of things each of us might wish to see or do before we kick the bucket.

The new edition has been updated with recently-introduced experiences, heretofore closed areas of the world, and hidden wonders. Certain existing sections have been refined. The up-to-the-minute best hostelries are featured. And Micato is honoured to have been included on the world’s most widely-shared bucket list.

Indeed, we’re noticing that travel writers everywhere are compiling their top bucket list-worthy destinations for the new year. And we couldn’t have been more pleased to discover that we’d been included on another as well—Forbes.com journalist Larry Olmsted included Micato Safaris in his round-up of the top ten bucket list trips for 2012.

In fact, he was kind enough to write: “I would only travel to Africa with Micato Safaris…! I would not go with anyone else…”

Needless to say, while we’re happy to be on every traveller’s bucket list, we want to move the possibility of safari from your “wish list” to your “to do” list for 2012. Take a look at our safaris and give us a call—we’re experts at bucket list wish fulfillment.

Kenya Creates a New National Park: Setting Aside Even More Land for Wildlife

  • December 8th 2011

Christmas has come early for Kenya’s wildlife. This year, the towering giraffes, lumbering elephants, leaping gazelles and sauntering big cats have been given the greatest gift that Kenya’s government could give them—its protection.

Kenya’s President Mwai Kibaki affirmed the country’s commitment to conservation this past November, when he designated a 17,100 acre piece of land as Laikipia National Park. Top priority for this park? Opening relevant corridors to wildlife migration—a key piece of the conservation puzzle for grazing animals like wildebeest and Cape buffalo, as well as the predators that stalk them as they migrate.

This new park is a sparkling addition to Kenya’s already quite brilliant crown of national parks, from Amboseli and the Maasai Mara in the south to Mt Kenya and Samburu in the north. These parks are known for their magnificent and abundant game. Of course, wildlife has no borders—animals can be found roaming freely throughout Kenya. The downside of this is that sometimes migrating herds find themselves on the highways and byways of the populated portions of the country or worse: in the crosshairs of a poacher.

The need for proper migrating pathways is so pressing that the government even constructed an underpass just for migrating elephants, which opened almost exactly a year ago. The biggest land mammal in the world, a herd of migrating elephants presents a daunting challenge to city planners. The government hatched this conservation scheme, and the results were astounding: the elephants compliantly used the tunnel, and both villages and elephants were saved.

With the dedication of Laikipia National Park, Kenya is again asserting the country’s commitment to this one goal: that its people and wildlife coexist safely and harmoniously.

“The government is convinced and committed to wildlife conservation in the natural habitat,” asserted the President, assuring the press that Kenya has more than adequate land to protect its wildlife as well as house and feed its people.

Laikipia National Park is ideally situated between two of our favourite private reserves in Laikipia Plateau—Loisaba and Lewa Downs—and thus can act as a bridge of safe crossing for migrating animals. It’s also a stunning new destination for anyone staying at either adjacent private reserve. The land is breath-takingly beautiful, dotted with a mix of acacia and prickly-pear cactus and capped with a massive sky. The plateau is also at quite a high elevation, with views of Mt. Kenya, so the evenings in Laikipia are crisp and cool and the big sky is thick with stars. This is a magnificent place, and the government’s commitment to keeping it that way is truly admirable.

The Lure of Southern Africa: A Different Kind of Safari

  • September 2nd 2011

Pristine wilderness populated by thousands of animals is the constant in both East and Southern African safaris. The regions share endless stretches of wild land, lions stalking prey, lumbering hippos, and curious giraffes. Where they diverge is in the myriad activities available in the south. The countries of Southern Africa have come into their own in the past few years, offering diversions unique to this land, a sparkling jewel at the base of the continent.

Perhaps you’d care for a trip to Cape Town, a sophisticated city that is Africa’s most sought-after destination for a reason. In just a day, you can visit two oceans and view wildlife as diverse as baboons and penguins. Stroll the old Victorian streets of Simon’s Town in the morning and after lunch paraglide off of Lion’s Head with unbelievable views of the city—the sweeping ocean in one direction, the vast wilderness in the other.

Table Mountain beckons beyond Cape Town and the sea

Whether diving with sharks and learning to surf (not, of course, in the same place!) or taking a ferry from the famed Victoria and Alfred Waterfront to the legend-soaked Robben Island, which was once used to hold political prisoners, including Nelson Mandela and current South African President Jacob Zuma, all types of travellers are sure to find a thrill in Cape Town.

For those seeking more pastoral pleasures, an idyllic destination is not far away. The Cape Winelands is not only stunningly lovely but also offers some of the world’s best vintages and hostelries, from boutique hotels to intimate farmstead-style lodges. The  fertile countryside not only yields world-class wines but also scrumptious farm-to-table meals, made with vegetables and herbs hand-picked from the garden, fish from the nearby sea, and local meats. A sojourn in South Africa’s Winelands should definitely be on everyone’s bucket list.

Private dinner in a wine cellar

And while you’re making said list, don’t forget to add one of the Seven Wonders of the World: Victoria Falls, the Grand Canyon of waterfalls. Hang-glide over the roaring falls and discover the true meaning of the word “awesome” or swim safely to the very edge in the famous Devil’s Pool. Because of the constant mists, this area is particularly cool and green, which makes it an excellent spot for golfing, tennis, and long walks in the rainforest, exploring this misty land of hippos and elephants, vervet monkeys and fish eagles.

The grandeur of Victoria Falls

Southern Africa’s active diversion are countless: fishing from helicopters, flight-seeing from bush planes, climbing Namibia’s gigantic sand dunes, exploring the Kalahari Desert by camel and quad bike, or gliding through Botswana’s Okavango Delta in a dugout canoe.

For a vicarious taste of travel in this unplumbed land, you can follow Micato’s own Pinto family as they explore the hidden corners of Southern Africa in distinctive Micato style (i.e. in absolute luxury). Perhaps it will inspire you to make your own trip south of the equator and into adventure beyond your wildest dreams…

Micato’s Africa, Through the Eyes of Three Journalists

  • July 28th 2011

In the flurry of activity that surrounded our eighth Travel+Leisure “World’s Best” win, we were remiss in sharing some truly great recent articles on the Micato Safaris experience. Here are a select few that highlighted for us some of the rare and precious glories of safari:

  • Great, great, great, great migrations. The pure pleasures of an African safari are legion, but Sarah Gold focused in on one in particular in her article on the World’s Great Animal Migrations for Travel+Leisure – the magnificent wildlife. The Wildebeest and Zebra Migration that she highlights is one of the most spectacular sights on the planet:, whether you’re witnessing thundering herds galloping across the plains or hundreds of creatures pausing for a morning snack on the savannah. Being there for this timeless journey from August through September makes visiting Kenya and Tanzania an automatic line on anyone’s bucket list.

 

  • Love on an exotic holiday. Luxury and the romance it yields is the focus of Rick Shively’s piece on Africa as a honeymoon destination for Recommend. The timeless romance of Africa has been well documented, from “The African Queen” to “Out of Africa,” but even without cinematic proof few would argue the point after waking beneath an ethereal canopy to coffee delivered on fine china and a view of the sun rising over Ngorongoro Crater, or from behind Mt. Kilimanjaro.

 

  • Friends in a foreign land. When Becca Hensley went on a Micato bespoke safari for San Antonio Magazine she found what she expected – wildlife in abundance and unbridled luxury. But she was surprised and thrilled to discover that it was the people of Africa that made her trip glow, especially her ever-present guides, who became friends. More than just unparalleled game spotters, her guides were also founts of information on topics ranging from photography to poaching, stars to social systems, and their conversation was as refreshing as the cocktails they mixed. In Hensley’s own words:

“They are everyman’s gateway to transformative African adventure. In short, they give us the gift of the bush. And that’s something worth squealing about.”

 

And there you have a trifecta of safari delight, brought to you by three lovely writers. Thank you Gold, Shively and Hensley for bringing the joys of safari to life with your words – we look forward to seeing your readers out in the bush for the real thing!

Meander to Mombasa When Next in Kenya

  • July 21st 2011

Offshore in Mombasa, Kenya. Flickr/Mckaysavage

One of the better-kept secrets in our beloved Kenya is the coastal city of Mombasa, roughly 300 miles southeast of Nairobi. Make the journey and you’ll be rewarded with white sand beaches as only the Indian Ocean can deliver them. And if you’re an architecture fan, we’re certain you won’t tire of taking in the Arabic and Portuguese influences that pervade the buildings here.

One of Mombasa’s most beautiful buildings is Fort Jesus,which was recently declared a World Heritage site by UNESCO. The military fort was built in the 1590s to protect the city, and its design reflects “the Renaissance ideal that perfect proportions and geometric harmony are to be found in the human body,” according to UNESCO. If you visit you’ll also note that the moat is still intact, which is not something you see every day.

Fort Jesus in Mombasa. Flickr/snowflakegirl

Beyond the picturesque beaches and honoured buildings, Mombasa is a friendly, fun city that sometimes flies under the radar of our travellers, who tend to add a Zanzibar side trip to their safaris when they’re in need of an Indian Ocean getaway. We love Zanzibar, too, of course, and perhaps if Mombasa had had a Billy Joel song named after it, it would be just as popular. That said, if you want to head off the beaten path to a coastal gem, we would be delighted to add Mombasa as an extension to your safari.

When Do You Let a Lioness Use Your Camera?

  • June 23rd 2011

Micato makes it possible for our guests to see Africa by helicopter, balloon or plane. Or by safari vehicle, mountain bike, elephant, camel, horse, or train. But what about from inside a lion’s mouth, you say? Well, that’s a luxury game drive we haven’t quite perfected yet.

But if you’re now curious about what a safari from the point of view of a lion’s mouth might be like, watch this three-minute video below, or here.

This bizarre but pleasurable video was brought to our attention by our friends at Tswalu Kalahari Game Reserve, where gifted photographer Roger de la Harpe was shooting photos for his book about African lions. We don’t want to completely spoil the video, but let’s just say a patrolling lioness chanced upon a video camera Roger set up to capture raw footage and found it rather savory.

On a more serious note, de la Harpe is doing more than assembling a jaw-dropping picture book. His Lion Project aims to raise awareness about the dwindling African lion population as well as raise funds to help with lion conservation. Likewise, Tswalu itself is largely a conservation area for the Kalahari’s species and savannahs.

Along those same lines, Micato partners with several organizations working to protect the creatures, habitats, and cultures of the places where we run luxury safaris, and we bring our guests to see these efforts whenever we can. To Roger de la Harpe, Tswalu Kalahari Game Reserve, as well as our partners committed to conservation, we would like to say a heartfelt “Asante Sana!”

As for the answer to that age-old riddle, when do you let a lioness use your camera? Whenever she wants, of course.

An Impossibly Beautiful Safari, and Beautifully Impossible Golf

  • June 2nd 2011

South Africa is renowned for many things: the work of native sons like Nelson Mandela and JRR Tolkien, hosting the 2010 World Cup, producing world-renowned wine, the enthralling mix of cultures – Kalahari Bushmen sharing a nationality with the grandsons of Dutch traders –  and having some of the most stunning and haunting landscapes on the planet.

Amidst all these wonders, South Africa’s world-class golf courses were once a well-kept secret. That is, until April of this year, when Johannesburg native Charles Schwartzel became the first golfer in the history of the Masters to birdie the final four holes and win the title.

The 26-year-old, who grew up on a chicken farm outside of the metropolitan bustle of one of South Africa’s most famous cities, has officially linked “golf” and “South Africa” in the minds of serious golfers the world over. Fortunately, Micato Safaris was ready for the sudden demand, stepping forward with a brand new itinerary: the South African Grand Golf Safari.

The courses in southern Africa are like none other, due in large part to the wild and majestic landscape. Serious and amateur golfers alike will revel in the stunning mountain views and lush wetlands on the Steenburg Golf Club, one of the country’s three best courses. The Montagu and Outeniqua courses at five-star resort Fancourt rival with each other for which has the most spectacular geographical diversity, but they also share the only TaylorMade Performance Lab in the southern hemisphere, where players can receive unparalleled swing analysis and custom fitting.

The Pezula Championship Golf Course provides breathtaking views of the South Cape’s craggy coastline and the Indian Ocean, and then it’s on to Legend Golf & Safari Resort. Legend combines an unimpeachable African experience – complete with opportunities to view rhinos, hippos, lions and leopards – with a truly unforgettable course, each hole designed by one of the world’s top professionals.

And still, we take you higher. Quite literally, actually. The Extreme 19 golf course has the highest and longest Par 3 in the world, accessible only by helicopter at more than 1,400 feet in the air. A tee shot takes a full 20 seconds to land on the green below.

The journey closes with a refreshing game blessed by the mists of Victoria Falls, at the Livingstone Royal Golf and Country Club. Founded in 1908, this course is a slice of old Africa, with a history rich in tradition and carried on by the likes of Charles Schwartzel, continuing to make southern Africa proud. The smell of fresh-cut grass blends with the headier scents of African flora, and as you inhale, smile, and swing, you just might birdie too.

Happy 50th Birthday, Maasai Mara. You Look Great For Your Age.

  • May 26th 2011

Looking fifty is great if you’re sixty, comedienne Joan Rivers once said, but we don’t think our beloved Maasai Mara has too much to worry about when it comes to looks.

This breathtaking wilderness of the Serengeti plains dates back centuries, but the fact that it was only established as a reserve in 1961 is little known. It’s a fact we’re happy to celebrate. The Mara may be the heart of most of Micato’s East Africa safaris, but it’s also our home.

Micato_Safaris_Maasai_Mara

The hauntingly stunning Mara is storied for its sweeping savannahs and the hundreds of thousands of creatures tramping along its ancient migratory routes. If within a single morning on safari you’re angling to see the entire “Big Five” – for the record, African buffalo, elephants, rhinos, leopards, and lions – you’ve come to the right place.

Every superlative used to describe the Mara’s beauty is accurate. But for Micato, its innermost beauty resides with its people, the Maasai, which is why we arrange for our safari guests in Kenya to meet at least two Maasai Elders.

Language barriers prevent most travellers from actually talking with Maasai Elders, but while in Nairobi, our guests will have the chance to chat with forward-thinking English-speaking elder Simon Lenini Ole Kassi. Later, when we take you to a Maasai village, you’ll meet a less worldly elder and his family. The contrast won’t be lost on you.

Step inside the village mud huts and you’ll notice that they’re simple and unadorned. The same can’t be said of the Maasai, bedecked with brightly coloured beads and robes as well as face paint, a nod to the fact that the Maasai are warriors and were once considered fierce ones. But their warmth and hospitality will move you like no other experience on safari.

Micato_Safaris_Maasai_Village

Visiting with the Maasai is just one way to harmonize with the beauty of the Mara. Your moment will come. It may happen when you’re spying crocodiles serenely basking in the sun or while you’re just as serenely floating over the Mara in a hot-air balloon. Or it’ll be after your game drive while you’re sipping a cocktail high upon the Mara Escarpment at sunset. Or, perhaps you’ll have one of those precious morning moments, devoid of human voices, when you step outside your tent and hear hippos bobbing and snorting in the river below.

Whenever and however many times it happens, we guarantee that you’ll fall in love with the Mara as we have, and as all Micato travellers have before you.

Happy Birthday, Maasai Mara. We wish you many happy returns.