Micato Musings


Archive for the ‘Travel’ Category

Helpful Tips for Overcoming Jetlag

  • February 5th 2015

By Leslie Woit

Apparently, you know you’re getting old when you consider the quality of your sleep a valid topic of conversation. Thankfully that doesn’t apply to international travellers like us.

Trans-meridian travel is tiring and jet lag can affect anyone. We ask Dr Rozina Ali, microvascular plastic surgeon and presenter of the BBC science program “Horizon, The Truth about Looking Young” for a hard science approach to battling jetlag.

What is jet lag?

international-time-zone-clocks

Crossing time zones can make you feel ‘zoned out’.

It’s a temporary sleep disorder caused when your circadian rhythms — the body’s internal clock – are out of whack. Your eyes may see Zanzibar, but your body says “zzzz”.

What can we do on the journey to encourage sleep?

The first thing to do on a night flight is to put yourself in a place where sleep is a possibility. Wear comfortable clothes, pack your bed socks, try to relax yourself, avoid adrenalines, caffeine and drink plenty of water: Dehydration can make jet lag symptoms worse. Get yourself in dark, quiet conditions by wearing an eye mask and blocking up your ears. We have a hormone in us that responds to darkness: the melatonin in you is saying ‘It’s dark, go to sleep now’. After, in order to wake up and stay awake longer, we can use sunlight as a powerful tool for regulating the sleep-wake cycle.

How does light therapy work?

Your body clock is influenced by exposure to sunlight. When you travel across time zones, your body has to adjust to a new daylight schedule. A good walk in the sunshine can ease that transition.

How about coffee and a cold shower?

We often don’t have the luxury on a holiday of adjusting gradually, an hour per day. So you have to give yourself a new sleep cycle straight away, or risk missing out on precious moments of our hard-earned vacation. That means staying up as long as you can the day of arrival. A little caffeine and some stimulants can keep you awake longer.

Is there a more natural approach than sleeping pills?

Melatonin is a hormone that controls the day-night cycle. As a supplement, it can be a sleep aid taken in the evening together with light therapy in the morning — a standard treatment for sleep disorders. When used several hours before sleep, small amounts of melatonin shift the circadian rhythm, helping you get to sleep quicker. It is a hormone and not available in some countries and there have only been a few long-term clinical trials. Melatonin is used, but it doesn’t mean it works. As a placebo, if you expect it to work, it may work for you.

What if I can’t access melatonin?

You may choose to supplement your body’s melatonin by taking 5HTP, a naturally occurring amino acid. It is required in the biosynthesis of two really important neurotransmitters: serotonin and melatonin. So in fact it’s even better than just taking melatonin because it may make you happy too!

What makes you happy?

The weathered sandstone of Petra, the Sydney Opera House, the boutiques of Paris… sundowners during an African sunset, the low golden light in Zanzibar, the friendly bustling markets of Dar e Salaam, the red sands of Mali and being utterly lost… and found in Timbuktu. These are moments worth staying awake for!

Sunset-in-Africa.

Sunsets in Africa are worth staying up for!

 

How do you overcome jet lag? Please share your travel tips in the comments space below.

 

Going Solo on Safari

  • January 7th 2015

By A. Ziegler

I wake up alone in my luxurious tent, after a cozy night deep in the Kenyan Plains surrounded by the sounds of nature.  I have space to gather my thoughts and dress in peace, before meeting my fellow guests—like-minded nature lovers who had been eager to meet a woman who went on a safari in Kenya by herself—for coffee and pastries as the sun crests the horizon, before we pile into Land Cruisers for the day’s first game drive.

The sense of wonder and anticipation, of never knowing at all what we’ll see, has made us fast friends. That, and being able to relive memories and share the day’s photos with those with whom we’re all sharing this experience.

This is why I’m often mystified that people think of travelling on an African safari as an experience that must necessarily be shared with loved ones: an über-romantic honeymoon, or a multigenerational celebration of a big birthday or anniversary. And those communal experiences and memories can indeed be magical.

Solo Traveller on Safari

One on One Sling-Shot Lessons from a Maasai Warrior

But having enjoyed several safaris on my own, I’d argue that an African adventure is just as compelling for solo travellers. It’s become one of my favourite suggestions when friends ask me where they can go by themselves, whether they want to have a major life-changing discombobulation after a breakup, or just hope to see a new part of the world without waiting for the perfect travel partner to materialize.

One thing I love about safari, both for solo travellers and for larger groups, is that it comes built-in with shared experiences and opportunities to socialize. Safari camps and lodges tend to be small, and the experience is communal. I love sharing Land Cruisers on game drives (though guests can request private vehicles), as well as sundowners and meals.

Safari guests—not to mention safari guides—are generally a lot of fun, as interested in wildlife as I am, and well-travelled and adventurous. How could I feel lonely among a dozen or so guests and camp staff gathered around a long table, trading stories about the game we’d seen and photographed that day, or our past and future travels, and maybe serving ourselves family-style from silver platters of delectable food.

Seasoned safari-goers are used to this setup—many of us consider it part of the experience—and are eager to welcome new people, even if they’ve come in a big group of their own. While I’ve treasured having time to myself to read, think or simply stare quietly at the landscape. I’ve been gratefully taken in by families in camps, and made lifelong friends. Once when I came down with a cold in Tanzania, everyone generously opened their medical kits to help me feel better.

Micato’s scheduled Classic Safaris are set up to encourage that balance of introspection and connection, as they put groups of guests together for action-packed, social itineraries through East Africa, with attentive Safari Directors and some of the best guides on the continent. But each day includes plenty of time to relax in camp, nap or have solo time—this isn’t the constant togetherness of a bus tour or cruise. And Micato trips have guaranteed departures, meaning that even if you sign up as just one, there’s no worry about a trip not meeting a minimum number of guests, or being moved from one departure date to another. You sign up, pay your deposit, buy your plane ticket and travel insurance, and you’re good to go. (And while there is a single supplement on the published rates, Micato will make efforts to pair potential roommates if people ask.)

On the flip side, if a traveller is going solo precisely because he or she craves solitude and space and time to think, or an itinerary that is entirely of his or her own devising, Micato can do that too. A Micato Bespoke Safari is a custom-designed, private experience. It might include steady companionship from a Micato Safari Director—one accompanies every Bespoke trip, offering information and insights on wildlife and Micato’s extensive efforts to do good in this part of the world (and provides the peace of mind that comes with knowing every detail is taken care of)—or if a guest doesn’t want to be social, there’s no pressure to spend more time beyond the game drives together, and no hard feelings if anyone asks to spend the evening with their book or their daydreams instead.

Curious about a solo safari?  Contact Micato’s reservations team (many whom have safaried solo themselves) to discuss logistics, travel plans and pricing.

Greetings from Micato’s Africa!

  • June 26th 2014

The Pintos (from left): Dennis, Joy, Felix, Jane, Sasha, and Tristan

Hello Friends,

Travelling as always with children Sasha and Tristan in tow, we have touched down in Nairobi.

Our annual summer migration from New York City to Africa is officially underway. Following tradition, we will join the elder Pintos for a month-long, three-generation safari, exploring all the delightful corners of Kenya and Rwanda.

Over the coming weeks we invite you to visit this blog, where we’ll post highlights and discoveries from our travels, including photos of magnificent vistas and creatures that never fail to take our breath away, no matter how often we visit.

We sincerely hope you enjoy these dispatches from Micato’s Africa.

With warm regards,

Dennis and Joy Pinto

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