Micato Musings


Tusker Beer—Legend, Lore & Why We Love It

If you’ve had friends safari with Micato, you’ve likely heard tell of Tusker Lager. Our guests and staff return from Africa with memories of many different favourite delicacies and cocktails, but we invariably find ourselves waxing lyrical about Kenya’s favourite beer.

But why the wistfulness? What makes Tusker so darn good?

As with all good things, there’s a good story. George Hurst went on a hunting trip on a fine day in 1923, just a year after founding Kenya Breweries with his brother Charles. The day turned tragic when George was killed by a rogue male elephant, known in the local parlance as a “Tusker”.

Turns out the brothers had been in the process of creating a lager. In memory of his brother, Charles Hurst named the resultant brew Tusker and underscored the idea with the beer’s famous elephant logo.

Thus are legends made.

Today, Tusker is by far the best selling beer in Kenya, with around 30% of the market. Kenya Breweries is equally successful, and the fact that the majority of shareholders are Kenyan makes Tusker’s slogan—“Bia Yangu, Nchi Yangu” (“My Beer, My Country” in Swahili)—literally true. There’s even a Kenya Breweries football club, Tusker FC, which is the third most successful football club in Kenya.

Tusker’s success is not solely due to its backstory, evocative as it is of colonial adventures and exotic dangers. Tusker is also, frankly, delicious. Its bubbly crispness is especially refreshing after a long day spent rumbling through the bush seeking game, summiting Mt. Kilimanjaro, or perusing treasures at a Maasai crafts market. A sundowner cocktail can certainly be anything you want it to be, but there’s something about the Tusker taste, clean and sweet, that mirrors a day in the bush.

Micato Safaris was founded by Kenyans Jane and Felix Pinto as a way to share the land they love, and it’s in that spirit that we appreciate that all Tusker ingredients are locally sourced. The barley is harvested from farms near the Maasai Mara, and that the sugar is delivered from farms in the Rift Valley. Even the yeast is developed locally.

So if you haven’t been on safari with us yet, you can add Tusker to your (very) long list of reasons to go. Of course the beer’s popularity now means that you can potentially get Tusker in your hometown in the U.S. now. But safari veteran friends will all say much the same thing: Tusker tastes a hundred times sweeter when you’re standing on the soil that grew the hops, watching the beer’s namesake trundle along the horizon, and raising a glass to the experience with your safari director—“Afya”! (Cheers!)

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